When the touch of a feather feels like the flame from an acetylene torch. If you never had chronic pain you don’t know what you’re missing. Thank your lucky-whatever you’ll shouldn’t have to know.

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A PAIN IN THE F*CKING CROTCH — A PAIN IN THE F*CKING ASS: EPILOGUE THREE

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The collective “they”, they being most of the medical profession, officially call pain “chronic” when it last from 3 to 12 months, when pain continues after healing, when pain is spontaneous coming from out of nowhere with no apparent trauma. What makes chronic pain unbearable, unlivable, hideous; if it’s a constant day-after-day intense, relentless agonizing 6 to 10 pain level.

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Chandler, the 16-year-old girl in the picture above and in the following video goes thru a 10 plus pain level and then some. She is a patient of Elliot Krane, director of Pain Management Services at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford, where he works on helping children in pain, studying and treating kids who are undergoing surgeries, suffering from complications of diabetes — and kids suffering “neuropathic pain” resulting from injury to the nervous system itself. 

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I have ulner nerve entrapment; a pinched compressed nerve in my elbow leaving the muscles in my left hand to entropy and for me to experience tingling, burning, pins and needles in the side of my palm and adjoining little finger. Muscle waste and those prickly sensations are the result of neuropathy; neuropathic pain occurs when there is actual damage to the nerve. My pain level goes from a 2 to a 4, can’t really call it pain, it’s chronic but livable, easy to tune out.  In Chandlers case her neuropathic pain was severe with no possible tuning out. 

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Different story when I experienced chronic pelvic pain, deep visceral pain, referred to as “urogenital pain syndrome”, precipitated by/after surgery. Relentless severe pain levels — 7 to 10, running for four months on end. 

Pelvic pain is a nociceptive pain; nocicepters are sensory nerve cells that respond to trauma such as a sprained ankle, broken legs, damage to body tissue/organs, sending nerve signals to the spine and brain. In my case the healing was over, the offending incident no more, but my sensory nerve cells never got the message — they were spooked, working themselves up the pain scale to a 10.

“About 10 percent of the time, after [a] patient has recovered … pain persists. It persists for months and oftentimes for years, and when that happens, it is its own disease.”
                                             Elliot Krane

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We think of pain as a symptom, but there are cases where the nervous system develops feedback loops and pain becomes a terrifying disease in itself. Starting with the story of a girl whose sprained wrist turned into a nightmare, Elliot Krane talks about the complex mystery of chronic pain, and reviews the facts we’re just learning about how it works and how to treat it.

◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊

A PAIN IN THE F*CKING CROTCH — A PAIN IN THE F*CKING ASS
The Invisible Wellspring of Chronic Pain.  A search for an answer, diagnosis, treatment in a sea of medical indifference/ignorance when it comes to chronic pain.

EPILOGUE ONE
Living pain free: I’m taking my meds, taking my side effects, taking my men’s guards and kettlebells, all 90LBS worth to the grave with me. I’m pumped.”

EPILOGUE TWO
Male Pelvic Pain: It’s Time to Treat Men Right.

EPILOGUE THREE
When the touch of a feather feels like the flame from an acetylene torch. 

One thought on “When the touch of a feather feels like the flame from an acetylene torch. If you never had chronic pain you don’t know what you’re missing. Thank your lucky-whatever you’ll shouldn’t have to know.

  1. Pingback: Male Pelvic Pain: It’s Time to Treat Men Right. | loosends

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